BACK YARD FARMER’S LUNCH

2015-01-15 - Italian Lunch

Cured olives (picked last year in Cromwell), dried tomatoes, garden salad, peperoni sott’ olio (capsicum under olive oil), peperoni grigliati (roasted capsicum), calabrese salame, pickled onions, provolone cheese, focaccia and, of course, dry wine (apple and black currant) – ALL HOME MADE. I am very happy with the result of all the hard work. A few more kilograms tomatoes, capsicums and eggplants processed should see us through the winter.

5 thoughts on “BACK YARD FARMER’S LUNCH

  1. What an amazing array of home prepared goodness. I am not one for preserving fruit in jars or making many chutneys or pickles but this kind of preserving is right up my alley. My garden produce is growing like topsy at the moment but even so, I doubt I will get any eggplants this year as I just didn’t have the space initially to plant them out. I have since created 2 more garden beds and planted them but they should be fruiting now, not teeny tiny seedlings. We appear to be on the way to a bumper crop of tomatoes this year as well as pumpkins, potatoes and beetroot. Lots of silverbeet but my spinach bolted so you win some, you lose some. I am allowing everything that went to seed to keep going so that I can collect seed. I am growing Moringa oleifera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera) at the moment to plant out when they get bigger and indigo for dyeing. I also got hold of some fresh macadamia nuts that I am attempting to grow for our property as well. Growing and preparing your own food is what makes life good. Here’s to a home-grown good life πŸ™‚

    • You are so correct in saying “Growing and preparing your own food is what makes life good”. Every day has its rewards, opportunities and challenges in the garden. Interesting reading about Moringa oleifera! It sounds as if you are very busy and productive in the garden!

      • We are trying to grow a food forest on our 4 acres with a whole lot of diversity thrown into the mix. The more diversity, the better the biota. I have been after a Moringa for years. Tried growing them from seed I sourced from ebay but they just refused to grow (seed probably too old) but a friend sent me some seed for Christmas and I have 3 growing now so fingers crossed I can keep them happy and plant them out as they are most useful trees indeed. I am just trying growing sweet potatoes this year from seedlings. I didn’t know that you could grow them this way but you learn something every day and hopefully I can grow a lot as I love them πŸ™‚

          • You certainly can grow spuds from seed but we use potatoes that we buy that go to seed and just cut the sprouted end off and let them go :). We don’t garden on our whole 4 acres. The front acre is jungle and tea trees and the back acre is a bush block. One day we will tackle them but for now we live and garden on the house block and in Sanctuary which is fully enclosed or we would have to do battle with the possums for our food

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